iris literary agency



Daffodil Fields

Written by 

Kastaniotis, 2014, 158 p.

Pandelis is married to Georgia; he has a penthouse and a car, for which he's still paying mortgage to the bank, and owns a little shop in downtown Athens. In other words, he is a common man ― with simple dreams and small ambitions. All of a sudden, he sees everything he had built crumble down, gradually vanishing, and cannot comprehend how it is that a collective tragedy can destroy someone who always had the good sense to remain detached.


On the streets of a city sinking into despair, among people he until recently used to avoid, he slowly comes to the understanding that nothing is for granted and that in the midst of all this garbage, cement and ugliness, there may still arise hope, not just for survival, but for life.

 

The new novel by Vassilis Danellis, while unfolding over the “ruins” of a modern metropolis, deals with timeless issues concerning human existence. Its heroes are people living right next to us, only we never pay attention, thinking nothing of them. The newly poor, the homeless, the outcast and the immigrants. People so suspended in today's reality, they could easily be us.

 

“Through his austere writing style, Vassilis Danellis attempts to trace the effects of the crisis on Athenian and, by extension, Greek society, but doesn't settle for just blaming it all on the perpetrators of this collective tragedy”  Filippos Filippou, Diastixo

Danellis Vassilis

Vassilis Danelis was born in 1982 in Athens, where he was raised and where he attended University. Since 2009 he has divided his time between Athens and Istanbul, but for many years also travelled, roaming from Ellroy’s Los Angeles, Lawrence Block’s new York and Taibo’s Mexico City to Izzo’s Marseille, Montalban’s Barcelona and numerous other cities with a noir element. He has always believed that Athens is equally, if not more, dark and mysterious. “Black Beer” is his first attempt to explain why he feels so.

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